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Matting Art Tips

Tips for Matting Artwork – Color, Size, and Display

Matting Artwork

When looking at a piece of art, matting can really brighten or enhance the image. People often ask if you should mat a picture based on the image itself or based on the room it will hang in. It’s actually a little of both. You don’t want to have a mat, frame, and picture totally clash with the wall it’s hanging on. But you also want to highlight some of the colors from the art. I like a mat to pull out some of the subtle colors in a picture. You can use just one mat or multiple! We’ve matted up to 4 times on some of our framed art in the retail store gallery.

Matting Artwork Tips
We also play with spacing the mats differently so there is a small gap between one mat and the next. It’s fun to try and pull colors out that you are drawn to or would like to feature. Mats can help draw your eyes to the uniqueness in a piece of art. You can play with the reveal (amount of each color shown) for each mat. Typically we have the bottom mat show 1/4″ and the top mat is 2″, but this can be customized depending on the art and the customer preference.

Another way to mat artwork is to do what is called “floating”. When you float something, the mat is solid behind your artwork. This is really cool when you have a signature that is right at the edge. Some artwork has rough edges and it would be a shame to hide the unique effect this creates in the piece. This is when floating can really help finish off the art.

Using Mats For Non-Standard Sized Images

Matting is also a great way to put an odd size picture into a standard size frame. For example, you want to fit your 10×12 picture into an 11×14 frame. We can cut a mat that will fit both the frame and the exact size needed for the image. We have tons of mats in stock in several colors. Plus we have a large selection of mats that we can order for customers.

Matting Art Tips Art Matting Tips
If you are framing artwork as a gift for someone, it is best to keep the colors and frames neutral since you don’t know where they may be hanging the gift.

Occasionally, we’ll have a customer bring in their framed artwork looking for something to spruce it up. Just changing the mats can totally change the overall look of your image. It can make it look like a completely new piece! We have so much fun playing with colors and finding what looks the best to make the art really pop!

-Laurie Meurer

Custom Framing

Custom Framing by Our Retail Team and Online

Frame USA Offers a Variety of Custom Framing Options to Make You the Perfect Frame

Here at Frame USA we run a retail store, an online store, and a full production warehouse all at our location in Cincinnati, Ohio. Every part of our team works hard to make Frame USA run smoothly and make the best quality products for our customers. However, this week we’d like to highlight the beautiful custom framing work done by our retail team!

Custom Frameing   Custom Framing Custom Framing

Our team layered multiple mats of different sizes and colors to give dimension to the frames and the artwork. They also used our engraving technology to add details to the frame in the first image. Customers can bring in their artwork or images to our retail store and use the expertise of our team to have them create the perfect unique frame for their piece. One of a kind custom ready made frames can also be bought in our retail store.

However, if you’re not located in Cincinnati or don’t have the time to visit our store, you can still get a custom frame! Our website also has a section for you to customize a frame specific to the size, material, mat, glazing, colors, etc. that you’d like. We’re proud of the creative work our retail team does on custom framing, but that doesn’t mean you can’t design a frame on your own.

If you just want a frame to be engraved, we also have a section on our website that allows you to customize your own engraving on a frame. The options for custom framing with Frame USA endless! Whether you want in person help from our creative and experienced retail team, or you want to design a frame yourself through our website, Frame USA is the perfect place for custom framing.

Denyia Gott

Preserving Framed Art with Conservation Mats: by Denyia Gott

At FRAME USA we work all day with frames and the materials to create them, but I wondered if this little bit of information might shed some light on the importance of using conservation materials to preserve art for years to come.

When framing a picture, you may opt to include a mat board.  When using a high quality mat board, it is possible to protect your picture or artwork from being discolored by the acidic properties of a wood frame or from external factors, including the wall the frame is being hung on. The mat is not only a beautiful addition to the framing, it also creates a buffered border that prevents acid from destroying what you are trying to protect.

There are several types of mat boards you can choose to use, the main two being AlphaRag and Paper Mat.  Each of these mat boards has specific properties that make them more desirable. AlphaRag is the highest quality mat board you can purchase and is made from cotton.  Rag is extremely durable and will stand the test of time by blocking all acid from getting to the picture. The colors available are somewhat limited and the pricing is higher than any other mat board, but it is a fair trade off to have the kind of mat board used to best protect your art.  Paper mat boards are the least expensive of all the mat boards, but they also do the least to protect your pictures over time. These boards are treated with a chemical to neutralize the acidity of the wood pulp used to make the mat. The problem is that this buffer will deteriorate over time, and the acidity of the wood will eventually damage the picture by leaving a burn mark on the art that cannot be removed. These mat boards are recommended for temporary framing and should only be used for a period of time.

Spending the little extra money in the beginning will make it possible to cherish your framed piece for many years to come.  Thanks for the read, from one happy framer!

 

What mat is right?

Talkin’ Bout Mats

To mat or not to mat? That is a valid question when putting art and photos into picture frames. When should you use a mat? What color mat should you use? Do I need acid free matting? There are no wrong answers (well, when it comes to mat measurements there can be wrong answers) to these questions but there are some typical things that people tend to do that might be helpful if you’re wondering what you should do about matting your piece before framing it. So let’s do a quick, easy-breezy run down of some common mat ideas.

WHEN SHOULD YOU MAT?

Not every picture you put in a frame needs a mat. If you just want to pop in one of the kids’ 5×7 or 8×10 school photos into a picture frame of the same size, and you’re just going to change it out the following year–those probably don’t need matted. Matted photos are usually ones that you plan on keeping framed indefinitely and that you want to give a little extra oomph to. The purpose of a mat is to give the picture some extra space in the frame so that you can use a larger picture frame to add dramatic weight to whatever the artwork is that you’re framing. A family portrait that you’re hanging in the living room, or a special art print that you’ve purchased and want to put in a nice, righ frame. These are the typical kinds of pictures you want to mat. Of course, you can mat anything you like but if you’re wondering, “Does this need matted?” this is a good rule of thumb.

What mat is right?
                                                                                          What mat is right?

Also, when you have a piece that is an unusual size but you’d like to try and get it into a standard sized frame–that is a time you’d want to get a mat. The mat will go to the inside edges of the frame and the opening then can be centered and made the size of the piece. The only caveat with this is that the vertical sides of the mat may be different than the horizontal so that one dimension has more space than the other, but this is a solution to that problem.

WHAT SIZE MAT AND OPENING SHOULD I GET?

Again, with sizing, there is no one right thing to do. If you’re basing the size of your frame on the size of your mat you start with the mat width. That is how much matting you want around your photo or art. A good safe, round number is 2″. A lot of people use this number. It’s not too much matting or too little. If your photo is small-ish (5×7) and you don’t want the frame to be much bigger, you can drop this down to 1″. And of course if you’re going for a certain look where you want a lot of space, or just a thin edge, you can do those too. The thinnest you can go, however, is 3/4″ because you must account for the lip of the frame taking up a little on each side. And speaking of accounting for the lip, you will also want to take into consideration making your mat opening slightly smaller than your piece (unless your piece has already built in a border around it to accomodate matting–in which case you can make your exact image size the opening size). For this example we’ll assume your piece has no border. You need to make the opening at least 1/4″ smaller than your actual paper or whatever physical medium your image is on. This is so the piece has something to fall against when put up to the opening and can be taped to the inside of the mat. We recommend 1/2″ total (which works out to be 1/4″ per side because there are two sides). Once you have your opening and how wide you want your mat, you can come up with your outer dimensions. Again, because the lip of any frame will take up a little of the mat, it’s nearly impossible to get the exact amount of space (unless you have the frame in hand and can measure the lip exactly), So for example, if your piece is an 11×14 photo and you want 2″ of matting you would:

Take 11×14 and remove 1/2″ from each side to get 10.5×13.5. This is your opening size. Then add 4″ to each side (this is taking both sides into account) to get 14.5×17.5. This is your outside dimensions and the opening size of your frame. Or, if you want a standard sized frame, a 16×20 would give you about 3.25″ of matting all the way around.

Mat Diagram

 

SHOULD I GET ACID FREE?

Most paper products contain some acidic chemicals. The amounts are minute, but over time they can discolor or damage a piece that they’ve been attached to for a long period of time. If the piece you’re matting and putting in a picture frame is not particularly special to you or is not valuable or will never be removed from it’s frame then you can probably safely use any standard or premium mat. It takes a long time for any damage to occur, if it ever does. However, if the piece is a one of a kind, a limited edition or something with sentimental value, you may want to consider acid free. Acid free mats are a little more expensive and don’t come in as many colors but they will not mar or damage your piece, even after years and years. If you are going to choose an acid free mat you’ll also want to be sure and affix your piece with acid free tape.

There are a lot of other questions that can go into matting; multiple openings, double and triple mats, color choices and textured mats. When you have specific questions about matting, you can always call the customer service department at Frame USA (800-577-5920) or live chat them through the website and they will help you choose and size the right mat for your piece. You can also use our Build-A-Frame service to do a step by step process that shows you what the mat and frame will look like (and you can even upload an image and compare it against your wall color to see how it will look) to make things even easier. Or if you know exactly what you want, feel free to go straight to Mat Designers and put in an order.

Matting may seem complicated once you get into it, but don’t overthink it and always ask questions. Your framed art piece will be better for it.